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Fog Monster

Fog monster developed for Star Wars: Episode IX - The Rise of Skywalker. Part of the hyperspace skipping sequence, J.J. had the idea to include a massive creature similar to the Space Slug in Empire Strikes Back. Originally described as a massive claw, J.J. wasn't interested in a complex design, he wanted something simple that felt almost like you could wear it as sock puppet if it was done as a practical vfx. Sr. Concept Designer Adam Ely and I developed the creature as well as the foggy environment. A bunch of sketches were done and we landed on the tri-claw design.
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Designs Supervisor: James Clyne
Art Director: Chris Voy
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Star Wars: Episode IX - The Rise of Skywalker 2019 © ILM Art Department

Keyframe of the First Order pursuing the Falcon.

Keyframe of the First Order pursuing the Falcon.

Originally a slim design, Director J.J. Abrams wanted it to feel heavier for the final design.

Originally a slim design, Director J.J. Abrams wanted it to feel heavier for the final design.

To push the mystery and creepiness it was decided to never show what the giant Claw was attached too.

To push the mystery and creepiness it was decided to never show what the giant Claw was attached too.

Several color variations fo the Claw referencing other Star Wars creatures.

Several color variations fo the Claw referencing other Star Wars creatures.

For the environment it was decided to be a happy medium, neither too foggy nor a clear cloudscape.

For the environment it was decided to be a happy medium, neither too foggy nor a clear cloudscape.

Color and saturation variations for the fog world. The monster's color and textures had to be dialed depending on the color scheme of the environment.

Color and saturation variations for the fog world. The monster's color and textures had to be dialed depending on the color scheme of the environment.

First designs had the monster being more massive. Since motion of big objects is slow, it was shrunk down to make it faster and more aggressive to better fit the action-oriented scene.

First designs had the monster being more massive. Since motion of big objects is slow, it was shrunk down to make it faster and more aggressive to better fit the action-oriented scene.